Thursday, March 3, 2011

Cyntoia Brown

http://www.wnpt.org/mediaupdate/2011/02/22/a-teen-facing-life-thoughts-on-cyntoia-brown-and-her-story/

The part that baffles me the most about this story is the fact that it was allowed to go this far. The psychological trauma associated with older child adoptions is not a new thing! Treatment for adoption issues is unique and can't be treated like other trauma issues! This is also not new. So how is it that a girl (with her KNOWN history) be arrested so many times and NEVER get the appropriate help?! And then this happens... what did they think would happen?! That she'd go to Juvenile DT and learn her lesson? Again- chronic trauma, especially in the first few years of life, and its effects on the brain is not new information!! My argument is not whether or not she is guilty. Teens being tried as adults is a completely different argument, one I am not making at this time. The part that sickens me that the media doesn't seem to get, is that she was let down waaaay before this murder took place. We very much know the violence a child with chronic PTSD and RAD is capable of. We also know that there are very specific treatments that are required to help these children. I am noone. So if I know this, how is it that those responsible for the welfare and healing of these children: Juv court systems, social workers, fostercare case workers, etc NEVER got her the appropriate help right from the start?!?! For this girl, it is too late. She is a convicted murderer. Even if she gets the appropriate help now, her future has been set. But what about the thousands more children in the US fostercare system (and around the world) that also suffer from RAD and chronic PTSD? How many more will be allowed to get so far gone before someone takes notice?!?!! How much longer will those that are in charge of their welfare continue in blind ignorance to what can be done to actually treat them. RAD and Chronic PTSD results in very disturbing behaviors, yet neither are permanent conditions. Shame on every "professional" adult that has touched this girl's life. This partially rests on their heads as well. Ignorance is no excuse- not when there is so much information that is readily available if anyone would take a FEW MINUTES to research it.

3 comments:

  1. After reading my post about the Cyntoia Brown story, I have had so many people ask me about what could have been done for this girl and what we have done for our children that were older child adoptions. Many of those people are also adoptive parents. First and foremost is Neurological Reorganization Therapy. To learn more about that you can read an older blog of mine from October 2009 titled "Neuro Reorg seminar at my house." I was very skeptical of this therapy when I first began researching ways to help my children. But traditional therapies (play therapy, talk/cognitive therapy, etc) were not helping. But NR kept coming up again and again in my research. We were desperate for help. Again, we are very familiar with the violence and disturbing behaviors that results from children that have RAD and chronic PTSD. We decided to take a leap of faith. It was the best thing I could have ever done for my children and family. After seeing the profound change in my children I strongly suggest that other adoptive families that are struggling with their children contact a NR provider. Our provider is Nina Jonio. Her contact information is on the older post that I mentioned. AFTER my boys had been doing NR for some time we also found another therapy called EMDR therapy. This was very helpful in processing bad memories that seemed to play over and over in their minds like a broken record. I believe in conjunction with NR this was also very helpful. But I also do not believe it would have been as successful without them first having done NR for some time. I have been told that cognitive (talk) therapy is more effective *AFTER* a child has graduated from NR therapy- because they are then capable of reasoning, cause and effect thinking, empathy, etc. However, it was our experience that it wasn't needed anymore. Help IS out there. Sometimes it takes a leap of faith, especially if it isn't something you are familiar with or have even heard of. But it does work. I don't know why so many sectors of the child welfare community are so slow to keep up with what is available, especially with all of the research and overwhelming evidence of trauma's effects on the brain. It seems that they are more than happy to point out the problems but slow to recommend the solutions. In the meantime, children and families suffer.

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  2. The wisdom you have gained from your family's path through difficult times has blessed my family in ways you can't even conceive. Everyone who reads Anita's blog should LISTEN TO HER! She knows what she is saying, lives by her words, and her advice really helps!

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  3. Wow Chris! Thank you so much!

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